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Terminal control/Cursor positioning

From Rosetta Code
Task
Terminal control/Cursor positioning
You are encouraged to solve this task according to the task description, using any language you may know.


Task

Move the cursor to column   3,   row   6,   and display the word   "Hello"   (without the quotes),   so that the letter   H   is in column   3   on row   6.

AArch64 Assembly[edit]

Works with: as version Raspberry Pi 3B version Buster 64 bits
 
/* ARM assembly AARCH64 Raspberry PI 3B */
/* program cursorPos64.s */
 
/*******************************************/
/* Constantes file */
/*******************************************/
/* for this file see task include a file in language AArch64 assembly*/
.include "../includeConstantesARM64.inc"
 
/*******************************************/
/* Initialized data */
/*******************************************/
.data
szMessStartPgm: .asciz "Program start \n"
szMessEndPgm: .asciz "Program normal end.\n"
szMessMovePos: .asciz "\033[6;3HHello\n"
szCarriageReturn: .asciz "\n"
szCleax1: .byte 0x1B
.byte 'c' // other console clear
.byte 0
/*******************************************/
/* UnInitialized data */
/*******************************************/
.bss
/*******************************************/
/* code section */
/*******************************************/
.text
.global main
main:
 
ldr x0,qAdrszMessStartPgm // display start message
bl affichageMess
ldr x0,qAdrszCleax1
bl affichageMess
ldr x0,qAdrszMessMovePos
bl affichageMess
 
ldr x0,qAdrszMessEndPgm // display end message
bl affichageMess
 
100: // standard end of the program
mov x0,0 // return code
mov x8,EXIT // request to exit program
svc 0 // perform system call
qAdrszMessStartPgm: .quad szMessStartPgm
qAdrszMessEndPgm: .quad szMessEndPgm
qAdrszCarriageReturn: .quad szCarriageReturn
qAdrszCleax1: .quad szCleax1
qAdrszMessMovePos: .quad szMessMovePos
/********************************************************/
/* File Include fonctions */
/********************************************************/
/* for this file see task include a file in language AArch64 assembly */
.include "../includeARM64.inc"
 

Ada[edit]

with Ada.Text_IO;
 
procedure Cursor_Pos is
 
begin
Ada.Text_IO.Set_Line(6);
Ada.Text_IO.Set_Col(3);
Ada.Text_IO.Put("Hello");
end Cursor_Pos;

ARM Assembly[edit]

Works with: as version Raspberry Pi
 
 
/* ARM assembly Raspberry PI */
/* program cursorPos.s */
 
/* Constantes */
.equ STDOUT, 1 @ Linux output console
.equ EXIT, 1 @ Linux syscall
.equ WRITE, 4 @ Linux syscall
 
 
/* Initialized data */
.data
szMessStartPgm: .asciz "Program start \n"
szMessEndPgm: .asciz "Program normal end.\n"
szMessMovePos: .asciz "\033[6;3HHello\n"
szCarriageReturn: .asciz "\n"
szClear1: .byte 0x1B
.byte 'c' @ other console clear
.byte 0
/* UnInitialized data */
.bss
 
/* code section */
.text
.global main
main:
 
ldr r0,iAdrszMessStartPgm @ display start message
bl affichageMess
ldr r0,iAdrszClear1
bl affichageMess
ldr r0,iAdrszMessMovePos
bl affichageMess
 
ldr r0,iAdrszMessEndPgm @ display end message
bl affichageMess
 
100: @ standard end of the program
mov r0, #0 @ return code
mov r7, #EXIT @ request to exit program
svc 0 @ perform system call
iAdrszMessStartPgm: .int szMessStartPgm
iAdrszMessEndPgm: .int szMessEndPgm
iAdrszCarriageReturn: .int szCarriageReturn
iAdrszClear1: .int szClear1
iAdrszMessMovePos: .int szMessMovePos
 
/******************************************************************/
/* display text with size calculation */
/******************************************************************/
/* r0 contains the address of the message */
affichageMess:
push {r0,r1,r2,r7,lr} @ save registers
mov r2,#0 @ counter length */
1: @ loop length calculation
ldrb r1,[r0,r2] @ read octet start position + index
cmp r1,#0 @ if 0 its over
addne r2,r2,#1 @ else add 1 in the length
bne 1b @ and loop
@ so here r2 contains the length of the message
mov r1,r0 @ address message in r1
mov r0,#STDOUT @ code to write to the standard output Linux
mov r7, #WRITE @ code call system "write"
svc #0 @ call system
pop {r0,r1,r2,r7,lr} @ restaur registers
bx lr @ return
 
 

Arturo[edit]

goto 3 6
print "Hello"

AutoHotkey[edit]

Works with: AutoHotkey_L

Remember that AHK is not built for the console, so we must call the WinAPI directly.

DllCall( "AllocConsole" ) ; create a console if not launched from one
hConsole := DllCall( "GetStdHandle", int, STDOUT := -11 )
 
DllCall("SetConsoleCursorPosition", UPtr, hConsole, UInt, (6 << 16) | 3)
WriteConsole(hConsole, "Hello")
 
MsgBox
 
WriteConsole(hConsole, text){
VarSetCapacity(out, 16)
If DllCall( "WriteConsole", UPtr, hConsole, Str, text, UInt, StrLen(text)
, UPtrP, out, uint, 0 )
return out
return 0
}

Axe[edit]

Since the rows and columns are zero-indexed, we must subtract 1 from both.

Output(2,5,"HELLO")

BaCon[edit]

' Cursor positioning, requires ANSI compliant terminal
GOTOXY 3,6
PRINT "Hello"

The X Y in GOTOXY is Column Row order.

BASIC[edit]

Applesoft BASIC[edit]

 10  VTAB 6: HTAB 3
20 PRINT "HELLO"

IS-BASIC[edit]

100 PRINT AT 6,3:"Hello"

Locomotive Basic[edit]

 10 LOCATE 3,6
20 PRINT "Hello"

ZX Spectrum Basic[edit]

 10 REM The top left corner is at position 0,0
20 REM So we subtract one from the coordinates
30 PRINT AT 5,2 "Hello"

BBC BASIC[edit]

PRINT TAB(2,5);"Hello"

Commodore BASIC[edit]

 100 print chr$(19) :rem change to lowercase set
110 print chr$(14) :rem go to position 1,1
120 print:print:print:print
130 print tab(2) "Hello"

Befunge[edit]

Assuming a terminal with support for ANSI escape sequences.

0"olleHH3;6["39*>:#,[email protected]

Blast[edit]

# This will display a message at a specific position on the terminal screen
.begin
cursor 6,3
display "Hello!"
return
# This is the end of the script

C/C++[edit]

Using ANSI escape sequence, where ESC[y;xH moves curser to row y, col x:
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
printf("\033[6;3HHello\n");
return 0;
}

The C version of the minesweeper game uses curses. Minesweeper_game#C

On Windows, using console API:

#include <windows.h>
 
int main() {
HANDLE hConsole = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE);
COORD pos = {3, 6};
SetConsoleCursorPosition(hConsole, pos);
WriteConsole(hConsole, "Hello", 5, NULL, NULL);
return 0;
}

C#[edit]

Works with: Mono version 1.2
Works with: Visual C# version 2003
static void Main(string[] args)
{
Console.SetCursorPosition(3, 6);
Console.Write("Hello");
}

COBOL[edit]

       IDENTIFICATION DIVISION.
PROGRAM-ID. cursor-positioning.
 
PROCEDURE DIVISION.
DISPLAY "Hello" AT LINE 6, COL 3
 
GOBACK
.

Common Lisp[edit]

ncurses[edit]

To interface the ncurses C library from Lisp, the croatoan library is used.

(defun cursor-positioning ()
(with-screen (scr :input-blocking t :input-echoing nil :cursor-visible nil)
(move scr 5 2)
(princ "Hello" scr)
(refresh scr)
;; wait for keypress
(get-char scr)))

D[edit]

ANSI escape sequences allow you to move the cursor anywhere on the screen. See more at: Bash Prompt HowTo - Chapter 6. ANSI Escape Sequences: Colours and Cursor Movement

Position the Cursor:
 \033[<L>;<C>H
    or
 \033[<L>;<C>f
puts the cursor at line L and column C.
 
import std.stdio;
 
void main()
{
writef("\033[6;3fHello");
}
 

Output:

0123456789
1     
2
3
4
5
6  Hello
9
8
9

Elena[edit]

ELENA 4.x :

public program()
{
console.setCursorPosition(3,6).write("Hello")
}

Euphoria[edit]

position(6,3)
puts(1,"Hello")

F#[edit]

open System
 
Console.SetCursorPosition(3, 6)
Console.Write("Hello")

Forth[edit]

2 5 at-xy ." Hello"

Fortran[edit]

Intel Fortran on Windows[edit]

program textposition
use kernel32
implicit none
integer(HANDLE) :: hConsole
integer(BOOL) :: q
 
hConsole = GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE)
q = SetConsoleCursorPosition(hConsole, T_COORD(3, 6))
q = WriteConsole(hConsole, loc("Hello"), 5, NULL, NULL)
end program


FreeBASIC[edit]

Locate 6, 3 : Print "Hello"
Sleep


Go[edit]

External command[edit]

package main
 
import (
"bytes"
"fmt"
"os"
"os/exec"
)
 
func main() {
cmd := exec.Command("tput", "-S")
cmd.Stdin = bytes.NewBufferString("clear\ncup 5 2")
cmd.Stdout = os.Stdout
cmd.Run()
fmt.Println("Hello")
}

ANSI escape codes[edit]

package main
 
import "fmt"
 
func main() {
fmt.Println("\033[2J\033[6;3HHello")
}

Ncurses[edit]

Library: curses
package main
 
import (
"log"
 
gc "code.google.com/p/goncurses"
)
 
func main() {
s, err := gc.Init()
if err != nil {
log.Fatal("init:", err)
}
defer gc.End()
s.Move(5, 2)
s.Println("Hello")
s.GetChar()
}

Icon and Unicon[edit]

If the OS has older termcap files, CUP is included with link ansi

procedure main()
writes(CUP(6,3), "Hello")
end
 
procedure CUP(i,j)
writes("\^[[",i,";",j,"H")
return
end

J[edit]

Using terminal positioning verbs of Terminal_control/Coloured_text#J

'Hello',~move 6 3

Julia[edit]

const ESC = "\u001B"
 
gotoANSI(x, y) = print("$ESC[$(y);$(x)H")
 
gotoANSI(3, 6)
println("Hello")
 

Kotlin[edit]

Works with: Ubuntu version 14.04
// version 1.1.2
 
fun main(args: Array<String>) {
print("\u001Bc") // clear screen first
println("\u001B[6;3HHello")
}

Lasso[edit]

local(esc = decode_base64('Gw=='))
 
stdout( #esc + '[6;3HHello')

Liberty BASIC[edit]

locate 3, 6
print "Hello"
 

[edit]

setcursor [2 5]
type "Hello

You can also draw positioned text on the turtle graphics window.

setpos [20 50]
setxy 20 30  ; alternate way to set position
label "Hello

Mathematica/Wolfram Language[edit]

Run["tput cup 6 3"]
Print["Hello"]

Nim[edit]

import terminal
setCursorPos(3, 6)
echo "Hello"

NS-HUBASIC[edit]

10 LOCATE 3,6
20 PRINT "HELLO"

OCaml[edit]

Using the library ANSITerminal:

#load "unix.cma"
#directory "+ANSITerminal"
#load "ANSITerminal.cma"
 
module Trm = ANSITerminal
 
let () =
Trm.erase Trm.Screen;
Trm.set_cursor 3 6;
Trm.print_string [] "Hello";
;;

Pascal[edit]

 
program cursor_pos;
uses crt;
begin
gotoxy(6,3);
write('Hello');
end.
 

Perl[edit]

Using the Term::Cap module:

 
use Term::Cap;
 
my $t = Term::Cap->Tgetent;
print $t->Tgoto("cm", 2, 5); # 0-based
print "Hello";
 

Phix[edit]

position(6,3)
puts(1,"Hello")

PHP[edit]

 
echo "\033[".$x.",".$y."H"; // Position line $y and column $x.
echo "\033[".$n."A"; // Up $n lines.
echo "\033[".$n."B"; // Down $n lines.
echo "\033[".$n."C"; // Forward $n columns.
echo "\033[".$n."D"; // Backward $n columns.
echo "\033[2J"; // Clear the screen, move to (0,0).
 

PicoLisp[edit]

(call 'tput "cup" 6 3)
(prin "Hello")

PowerShell[edit]

The following will only work in the PowerShell console host. Most notably it will not work in the PowerShell ISE.

$Host.UI.RawUI.CursorPosition = New-Object System.Management.Automation.Host.Coordinates 2,5
$Host.UI.Write('Hello')

Alternatively, in any PowerShell host that uses the Windows console, one can directly use the .NET Console class:

[Console]::SetCursorPosition(2,5)
[Console]::Write('Hello')

PureBasic[edit]

EnableGraphicalConsole(#True)
ConsoleLocate(3,6)
Print("Hello")

Python[edit]

Using ANSI escape sequence, where ESC[y;xH moves curser to row y, col x:
print("\033[6;3HHello")

On Windows it needs to import and init the colorama module first.

ANSI sequences are not recognized in Windows console, here is a program using Windows API:

from ctypes import *
 
STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE = -11
 
class COORD(Structure):
pass
 
COORD._fields_ = [("X", c_short), ("Y", c_short)]
 
def print_at(r, c, s):
h = windll.kernel32.GetStdHandle(STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE)
windll.kernel32.SetConsoleCursorPosition(h, COORD(c, r))
 
c = s.encode("windows-1252")
windll.kernel32.WriteConsoleA(h, c_char_p(c), len(c), None, None)
 
print_at(6, 3, "Hello")

Quackery[edit]

  [ number$ swap number$ 
$ 'print("\033[' rot join
char ; join
swap join
$ 'H", end="")' join
python ] is cursor-at ( x y --> )
 
3 6 cursor-at say "Hello"

Racket[edit]

 
#lang racket
(require (planet neil/charterm:3:0))
(with-charterm
(charterm-clear-screen)
(charterm-cursor 3 6)
(displayln "Hello World"))
 

Raku[edit]

(formerly Perl 6) Assuming an ANSI terminal:

print "\e[6;3H";
print 'Hello';

Retro[edit]

with console'
: hello 3 6 at-xy "Hello" puts ;

REXX[edit]

The REXX language doesn't have any cursor or screen management tools,   but some REXX interpreters have
added the functionality via different methods   (such as functions and/or subroutines).

/*REXX program demonstrates moving the cursor position and writing of text to same place*/
 
call cursor 3,6 /*move the cursor to row 3, column 6. */
say 'Hello' /*write the text at that location. */
 
 
 
call scrwrite 30,50,'Hello.' /*another method, different location. */
 
call scrwrite 40,60,'Hello.',,,14 /*another method ... in yellow. */
exit 0 /*stick a fork in it, we're all done. */

Ring[edit]

 
# Project : Terminal control/Cursor positioning
 
for n = 1 to 5
see nl
next
see " Hello"
 

Output:





   Hello

Ruby[edit]

Library: curses
require 'curses'
 
Curses.init_screen
begin
Curses.setpos(6, 3) # column 6, row 3
Curses.addstr("Hello")
 
Curses.getch # Wait until user presses some key.
ensure
Curses.close_screen
end

Scala[edit]

Works with: Ubuntu version 14.04
object Main extends App {
print("\u001Bc") // clear screen first
println("\u001B[6;3HHello")
}

Seed7[edit]

The function setPos is portable and positions the cursor on the console window. SetPos is based on terminfo respectively the Windows console API.

$ include "seed7_05.s7i";
include "console.s7i";
 
const proc: main is func
local
var text: console is STD_NULL;
begin
console := open(CONSOLE);
setPos(console, 6, 3);
write(console, "Hello");
# Terminal windows often restore the previous
# content, when a program is terminated. Therefore
# the program waits until Return/Enter is pressed.
readln;
end func;

Tcl[edit]

exec tput cup 5 2 >/dev/tty
puts "Hello"

UNIX Shell[edit]

# The tput utility numbers from zero, so we have subtracted 1 from row and column
# number to obtain correct positioning.
tput cup 5 2

Whitespace[edit]

Using ANSI escape sequence, where ESC[y;xH moves curser to row y, col x (see below):

   		 				











 

 
 
 
 










 


 
 

 

This solution was generated from the following pseudo-Assembly.

push "Hello"	;The characters are pushed onto the stack in reverse order
push "[6;3H"
push 27 ;ESC
 
push 11 ;Number of characters to print
call 0 ;Calls print-string function
exit
 
0:
dup jumpz 1 ;Return if counter is zero
exch prtc ;Swap counter with the next character and print it
push 1 sub ;Subtract one from counter
jump 0 ;Loop back to print next character
 
1:
pop ret ;Pop counter and return

XPL0[edit]

include c:\cxpl\codes;  \intrinsic 'code' declarations
 
[Cursor(2, 5); \3rd column, 6th row
Text(0, "Hello"); \upper-left corner is coordinate 0, 0
]

Wren[edit]

System.write("\e[2J")        // clear the terminal
System.print("\e[6;3HHello") // move to (6, 3) and print 'Hello'

zkl[edit]

Translation of: C/C++

Using ANSI escape sequence, where ESC[y;xH moves curser to row y, col x:

print("\e[6;3H" "Hello");